FAQ

Honest Ingredients

Why does it appear that you have added evaporated cane sugar to some of your products on your new packaging’s Nutrition Facts Panel?

With the new packaging design we also took a closer look at our ingredient and nutritional information.

The molasses ingredient we have always used to sweeten our cereals is a dried blend of materials made by crushing mature sugar cane plants to make unsulfured molasses.   The first stage of the molasses process results in a material with a high sugar content and sweet clean flavor.  This material is basically evaporated cane sugar syrup.  The second stage of the molasses process is a further extraction of the sugar out of the first stage syrup into a material that is dark in color, slightly bitter and only mildly sweet.  This second stage material is ‘unsulfured molasses’.  When we more thoroughly discussed this process with our raw material supplier we at Barbara’s wanted to more accurately describe the process to better account for what the material is and that it really is a blend of cane sugar and unsulfured molasses in the end.  The cane sugar used is a byproduct of the production of the molasses.

Neither the recipe nor the sugar content has changed.

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Why did you change the name of the Shredded Oats to Morning Oat Crunch?

We changed the name because we felt that it would better describe the product, as it is not actually composed of shredded ingredients and has a very crunchy texture.  The product itself has not changed but, after reviewing our Nutrition Fact Panel, we have adjusted some of our declarations to more accurately reflect the ingredient and nutritional statements.

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What are expeller pressed oils and why does Barbara’s use them?

Expeller pressed oils are mechanically extracted (pressed) from the oil source without the use of the petroleum-based chemicals or solvents commonly used to extract oils from seed. Expeller pressed oils retain most of their nutrients including valuable Omega 3 (alpha linolenic acid) and 6 (linoleic acid) essential fatty acids.

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What are hydrogenated oils and why are they bad?

Hydrogenation is the process of forcing hydrogen atoms to combine with unsaturated fatty acids. The process changes liquid vegetable oils into a more solid form. Hydrogenated oil resists rancidity and extends the shelf life of various foods, including cakes, cookies, crackers and breakfast cereals. Unfortunately this process produces trans fatty acids and the evidence shows that trans fats are dangerous for humans.

Trans fat raises the “bad” LDL blood cholesterol levels, while lowering the “good” HDL blood cholesterol in your body. This, of course, increases the risk of coronary heart disease.

Trans fatty acids are also found in all hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, including margarine and shortening.

We advise all consumers to check ingredient lists for hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils.

Since our beginning in 1971, we have always said “NO” to hydrogenated oils. At Barbara’s we have NEVER, and will never, use hydrogenated oil in our products, relying instead on naturally extracted expeller pressed oils, small batch processes, and high quality packaging to ensure freshness.

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What are natural flavors and colors? Would you please give some examples?

Examples of natural flavors include: spices, vanilla extract, almond extract, lemon oil, chocolate extract and herbs. Many of our natural flavors are derived from spices, fruits, vegetables and plant materials. Barbara’s natural flavors or colors never contain refined white sugar, preservatives, artificial flavors, petroleum derivatives or monosodium glutamate (MSG). We work closely with our suppliers to ensure that only the most wholesome ingredients are used and meet Barbara’s high quality standards.

Some of Barbara’s natural coloring ingredients include: annatto (a shrub native to the Caribbean, South and Central Americas), turmeric, and vegetable extracts. We do not use any FD&C colors in any Barbara’s products. We only use naturally derived additives, without synthetics.

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What is Canola Oil?

Canola oil is made from rapeseed, a member of the mustard family. (The canola plant was bred using traditional crossbreeding methods and was not genetically engineered).

Many health experts believe the monounsaturated fats found in canola oil, particularly the omega-3 fatty acids, are an important part of a healthy diet, decreasing the risk of heart disease and some cancers.

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What is the definition of “whole grains”? Why are whole grains good for you?

Great question! The entire seed of the plant, also known as the “kernel” is made up of the bran, the germ, and the endosperm. A whole grain product will always contain these three vital kernel components, whether the grain is eaten whole, cracked, split, or ground into flour. Popular whole grains include wheat, corn, rice, oats and barley. To incorporate whole grains into your diet, check to see if the ingredient statement uses the word “whole” – as in “whole wheat”, “whole oats”, and so on.

Whole grains are healthier than those that are not whole and provide more protein, fiber, and many important vitamins and minerals. Eating whole grains reduces the risks of heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, and obesity. (Source: The Whole Grains Council).

As founding members of the Whole Grains Council, we at Barbara’s promote “Whole Grains at Every Meal.” Look for the gold whole grain stamp on Barbara’s whole grain products.

The Council’s aim is to educate consumers, health professionals, and chefs on the numerous benefits of eating whole grains. Visit the WGC website (www.wholegrainscouncil.org) for more information on how whole grains are beneficial to your body.

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Product Specific

Why does it appear that you have added evaporated cane sugar to some of your products on your new packaging’s Nutrition Facts Panel?

With the new packaging design we also took a closer look at our ingredient and nutritional information.

The molasses ingredient we have always used to sweeten our cereals is a dried blend of materials made by crushing mature sugar cane plants to make unsulfured molasses.   The first stage of the molasses process results in a material with a high sugar content and sweet clean flavor.  This material is basically evaporated cane sugar syrup.  The second stage of the molasses process is a further extraction of the sugar out of the first stage syrup into a material that is dark in color, slightly bitter and only mildly sweet.  This second stage material is ‘unsulfured molasses’.  When we more thoroughly discussed this process with our raw material supplier we at Barbara’s wanted to more accurately describe the process to better account for what the material is and that it really is a blend of cane sugar and unsulfured molasses in the end.  The cane sugar used is a byproduct of the production of the molasses.

Neither the recipe nor the sugar content has changed.

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Why did you change the name of the Shredded Oats to Morning Oat Crunch?

We changed the name because we felt that it would better describe the product, as it is not actually composed of shredded ingredients and has a very crunchy texture.  The product itself has not changed but, after reviewing our Nutrition Fact Panel, we have adjusted some of our declarations to more accurately reflect the ingredient and nutritional statements.

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Do you use animal rennet in any of your products that contain cheese or cheese cultures?

No. We use vegetable rennet – a term used to define any non-animal source rennet. Vegetable rennet is an enzyme derived from plants or microbes.

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How can I Adopt-A-Puffin?

There are two ways to adopt a puffin. You can donate $100 directly to Audubon’s Project Puffin (projectpuffin.audubon.org) or you can collect box tops or UPC symbols from any Puffins or Wild Puffs cereal flavor and send them to Barbara’s Bakery.

Your school, classroom, club or other organization can adopt and name its very own puffin. Just collect 20 box tops or UPC code flaps (found at the base of the box) and send them to Barbara’s Attn: Adopt-A-Puffin, 300 Nickerson Rd, Marlborough, MA 01752. Through Audubon’s program, we will adopt one puffin for one year. Individuals can also participate by sending in box tops. We’ll pool them until we have enough to adopt a puffin.

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How is your Shredded Wheat cereal made?

Raw wheat berries are steamed and shredded. The still-moist shreds of wheat are rolled up into servings called “muffets”, which are then toasted and wrapped for packaging.

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Which of your products are suitable for Vegan or Vegetarian diets?

ALL of our products are suitable for Vegetarians!

We are very cautious and thorough in our examination of ingredients before we label our products “Vegan”. The following products are suitable for Vegan diets:

Cereals
  • Puffins, Peanut Butter
  • Puffin Puffs, Fruit Medley
  • Puffin Puffs, Cocoa Crunch
  • Snackimals Cereal Vanilla Blast
  • Snackimals Cereal Cinnamon Crunch
  • Snackimals Cereal Chocolate Crisp
  • Honest O’s, Original
  • Brown Rice Crisps
  • Corn Flakes
  • Shredded Wheat
  • Shredded Spoonfuls
  • Multigrain Squarefuls
  • High Fiber, Original
  • High Fiber Cranberry
  • High Fiber Flax & Granola
Snacks
  • Fig Bars, Raspberry
  • Fig Bars, Multigrain
  • Fig Bars, Whole Wheat

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Special Diets

Do you have any cereal made with gluten free ingredients?

Cereals
  • Puffins, Honey Rice
  • Puffins, Multigrain
  • Brown Rice Crisps

*Batch tested at 20ppm

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I am on a special or restricted (Gluten Free, Kosher, Low Fat, Low Sodium, No Salt Added, Wheat Free, etc.) diet. Which of your products are suitable for me?

Visit our Special Dietary Needs page to see if that answers your question.

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